Food, Food Artisans

This Week at Zingerman’s 7/28/15

 Mahjoub Couscous jar

Summer Sale ends July 31st!

Great things are happening at Mail Order right now! The first is our annual Summer Sale (also happening at Zingerman’s Deli!), which features amazing deals on some of our favorites! Like Bonito Tinned Tuna, or our famous Zzang Bars, or Rustichella Italian Pastas. Check out the Summer Sale page for more! Hurry, the sale ends July 31st! 
The other noteworthy event is our Olive Oil Pop Up Shop, which contains some really excellent oils at very affordable prices. Domestic favorites like California’s Seka Hills, or La Sovana from Tuscany, or Crudo, a bold, spicy oil from the southeastern corner of Italy. Check out the rest of the selection at our Pop Up Shop!


Welcome to Cornman Farms tour

Our Welcome to Cornman Farms Tour is an idyllic and dynamic 90 minute introduction to the rich history, agricultural projects and humane raising of animals. Join us Wednesday, July 29, 6pm, for a look at our vegetable and herb gardens, goat milking operation and historic restored Farmhouse and Barn—and enjoy a meet-and-greet with our visionary Managing Partner, Kieron Hales.

Reserve your seat here


1st Sunday Tour at Zingerman’s Creamery

Join our cheese and gelato makers on Sunday, August 2, 2pm, for an hour-long adventure as we transform local milk into delicious cheese and gelato. You’ll watch our fresh mozzarella stretched into shape, taste our cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses while our staff explain the cheesemaking process, and sample our delicious fresh gelato. After the tour, make time for tasting our selection of American cheeses and provisions, as well as house made gelatos and sorbets in our cheese shop.
*Please note, our production facility is very warm and humid during the summer months!

Reserve your seat here


Tea Time With a Twist at Zingerman’s Creamery

You might not think of tea as being a typical pairing for a slice of cheese, but the two can be exceptionally good together. Much like wine, certain teas contain tannins that are released once the tea leaves are exposed to hot water, giving it a full-bodied taste and making it a perfect accompaniment to cheese. Our cheesemongers have teamed up with the experts next door at the Zingerman’s Coffee Co. to choose some of our favorite teas sourced from Rishi Tea and picked some perfect cheeses to pair up that will make you look at tea time in a whole new way! Friday, August 7, 6pm. 

Reserve your seat here


11th Annual Piazza Zingermanza at Zingerman’s Deli

Saturday August 15 and Sunday, August 16, 11am – 3pm
Our annual August tradition of transforming the Deli’s Patio into an Italian Street Food Festival is one of the highlights of the year. There will be good food, good music, good demos, good deals and good company. New this year, a kids’ pasta tasting. It’s an event not to be missed!

Demonstrations:
12 noon: Witness our cheesemongers break down 80 pound wheels of Parmigiano Reggiano in one pound chunks.

1 pm: Behold as we transform curd into delectable fresh mozzarella balls sold by the half pound.

2 pm: Observe our skilled staff slicing true Prosciutto di Parma right off the bone into snackable bites.

This event is FREE!


See you soon!

Food, Food Artisans

Couscous from Tunisia

A brief history of really good coucous

In the mountains and valleys that stretch across North Africa, there’s no guarantee of a good harvest from year to year. That’s nothing new for the Berbers. They’ve been farming olives, wheat, vegetables, and fruits there since before Carthage was founded in 814 BCE. (The name “Berber” actually comes from the Roman name for the people: barbarians. In their own language, Berbers call themselves Amazigh, or Free People.) In a good year a Berber tribe would grow plenty of food to sustain themselves. But even in a good year, the farmers learned to look ahead to the future. What if the next year there’s a drought and the harvest is limited? And what if that happens two years in a row? Or what if, after a year or two of bad harvests, a hungry neighboring tribe invades and pillages their food supplies? Those were all common scenarios for the semi-nomadic Berbers.

The solution was to make the harvest transportable.Mahjoub-Couscous

Like most people looking to preserve food before the days of refrigeration, the Berbers used what they had on hand: salt, oil, sun. In Tunisia, smack dab in the middle of Berber land, sun drying has always been the most important method of preservation. Drying not only preserves, but it also makes the food weigh less. Should the tribe decide to pack up and move, they could take it with them. The Berbers sun dried everything: tomatoes, stone fruits, peppers. And to preserve wheat, they would sun dry couscous.

The basics of making traditional couscous are pretty simple. You take semolina flour and mix it with a bit of salt and water, rub it together to form tiny balls of dough, and then dry ’em out. Today, though, most couscous is made with big, industrialized machines. The whole process can be completed in a couple of hours from start to finish, including just seven minutes for mixers to form the balls and then a whopping eighteen minutes to dry them in huge rotating ovens.

There are still a few producers out there making couscous the traditional, slow way that the Berbers would have made it. The best couscous I know of is made by Majid Mahjoub, himself a descendant of the Berbers, and his company Les Moulins Mahjoub. Mahjoub couscous is m’hamsa (hand-made, in Arabic). Using the Razzag variety of wheat that they grow organically on their own farm, they roll every little ball of couscous by hand, the way it’s been done for millennia. For that reason, this couscous is a little bigger than most, and you may notice that it looks a tad less uniform. That’s a good thing. After the couscous has been shaped, it dries in the sun. That drying doesn’t take minutes or hours—it takes days. All told, a batch of Mahjoub couscous takes about ten days from start to finish.

All that time drying in the sun has a huge impact on flavor.

It’s like the difference between bread that’s allowed to slowly rise and proof for most of a day versus the stuff that’s baked as quickly as possible. The longer drying time allows the couscous to develop deeper, richer flavor. In essence, couscous that’s produced as quickly as possible tastes like flour, while couscous that is made more slowly tastes like bread. The exact same thing happens with the flavor of traditional pastas that are allowed to dry slowly rather than being baked as quickly as possible. Mahjoub couscous is wheaty, toasty, nutty, earthy, with a chewy, firm, toothsome texture. This is no boring grain to be relegated to the corner of the plate and smothered in spices and sauces.

I still remember the first time I tasted Mahjoub couscous. It was a little more than six years ago. The first bite stopped me in my tracks. I had no idea that couscous could be so delicious. But once I got over the surprise, I went back for more, and more, and more. I still always keep a jar or two in my pantry and cook it at least a couple times a month.

Cooking couscous is as easy as boiling water.

Seriously. You bring a pot of water to boil, add the couscous, bring it back to a boil, take the pan off the heat, put a lid on it, and let it sit. After ten minutes, you fluff the couscous with a fork and it’s ready to eat. Majid visits us in Ann Arbor from time to time and he’s cooked up some some outstanding couscous dishes for us. Here are a few of my favorites:

  • Couscous with tomato sauce and a perfect egg
    This is one of the simplest ways I know of to serve couscous, and conveniently, it’s also one of the most delicious. After cooking the couscous—roughly ⅓ cup per person as a side dish, or a bit more as a main dish—stir in a bit of good extra virgin olive oil to keep it from sticking. Dish it onto plates and then on top of the couscous spoon a healthy dollop of your favorite tomato sauce, warmed on the stove. Then top that with an egg. I’m partial to a poached egg with the yolk still soft and oozy, but you could use a fried egg, a diced hard-boiled egg, whatever kind of egg fits your fancy. Sprinkle with salt and a grind of fresh pepper, and serve immediately.
  • Couscous salad
    To serve four to six people, use 1 1/2 cups of couscous. Once it’s cooked through, stir in a couple tablespoons of good extra virgin olive oil, then let it cool. While it cools, dice a bunch of vegetables: an onion, two tomatoes, a sweet pepper, a cucumber, a little fresh mint, and a preserved lemon. When the couscous has reached room temperature stir in all the vegetables along with a few capers and a splash of white wine vinegar. Once it’s all mixed up, refrigerate it for half an hour or so to chill it and let the flavors meld. Just before serving taste and add salt if needed.
  • Sweet couscous
    Majid uses three parts milk to one part couscous. Bring the milk to a boil, and add the couscous. Let it simmer for five minutes, then remove it from the heat and let it cool a bit. That’s it—it’s ready to serve. Majid likes to add a bit of jam to it, but he also recommends you could add a little sugar to sweeten it up a bit more. Since hearing about the recipe, I’ve made it with a little maple syrup and cinnamon and that turned out pretty delicious. Majid likes to eat sweet couscous for breakfast. In the summer he likes to make it the night before and keep it in the fridge overnight, then serve it cold, like a couscous version of rice pudding.

Mahjoub Couscous jar

Did we mention that Sun Dried Couscous from Les Moulins Mahjoub is part of our annual Summer Sale? Hurry, sale ends 7/31!

See you soon! 

Food, Food Artisans

This Week at Zingerman’s 7/21/15

 Lincoln log

White Wine & Cheese Tasting at Zingerman’s Creamery

Join us this Friday, July 24, 6pm, as we explore the beautiful variety of white wines produced in our great state of Michigan! From light, dry, crisp Pinots to sweet, full-bodied Gewurztraminer we will taste through some of our top white wine picks and pair them up with cheeses from the shop.

Reserve your seat here


Summer Sale and Olive Oil Pop Up Shop at Mail Order and the Deli

Great things are happening at Mail Order right now! The first is our annual Summer Sale (also happening at Zingerman’s Deli!), which features amazing deals on some of our favorites! Like Bonito Tinned Tuna, or our famous Zzang Bars, or Rustichella Italian Pastas. Check out the Summer Sale page for more! Hurry, the sale ends July 31st! 
The other noteworthy event is our Olive Oil Pop Up Shop, which contains some really excellent oils at very affordable prices. Domestic favorites like California’s Seka Hills, or La Sovana from Tuscany, or Crudo, a bold, spicy oil from the southeastern corner of Italy. Check out the rest of the selection at our Pop Up Shop!


Welcome to Cornman Farms tour

Our Welcome to Cornman Farms Tour is an idyllic and dynamic 90 minute introduction to the rich history, agricultural projects and humane raising of animals. Join us Wednesday, July 29, 6pm, for a look at our vegetable and herb gardens, goat milking operation and historic restored Farmhouse and Barn—and enjoy a meet-and-greet with our visionary Managing Partner, Kieron Hales.

Reserve your seat here


1st Sunday Tour at Zingerman’s Creamery

Join our cheese and gelato makers on Sunday, August 2, 2pm, for an hour-long adventure as we transform local milk into delicious cheese and gelato. You’ll watch our fresh mozzarella stretched into shape, taste our cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses while our staff explain the cheesemaking process, and sample our delicious fresh gelato. After the tour, make time for tasting our selection of American cheeses and provisions, as well as house made gelatos and sorbets in our cheese shop.
*Please note, our production facility is very warm and humid during the summer months!

Reserve your seat here


Tea Time With a Twist at Zingerman’s Creamery

You might not think of tea as being a typical pairing for a slice of cheese, but the two can be exceptionally good together. Much like wine, certain teas contain tannins that are released once the tea leaves are exposed to hot water, giving it a full-bodied taste and making it a perfect accompaniment to cheese. Our cheesemongers have teamed up with the experts next door at the Zingerman’s Coffee Co. to choose some of our favorite teas sourced from Rishi Tea and picked some perfect cheeses to pair up that will make you look at tea time in a whole new way! Friday, August 7, 6pm. 

Reserve your seat here


11th Annual Piazza Zingermanza at Zingerman’s Deli

Saturday August 15 and Sunday, August 16, 11am – 3pm
Our annual August tradition of transforming the Deli’s Patio into an Italian Street Food Festival is one of the highlights of the year. There will be good food, good music, good demos, good deals and good company. New this year, a kids’ pasta tasting. It’s an event not to be missed!

Demonstrations:
12 noon: Witness our cheesemongers break down 80 pound wheels of Parmigiano Reggiano in one pound chunks.

1 pm: Behold as we transform curd into delectable fresh mozzarella balls sold by the half pound.

2 pm: Observe our skilled staff slicing true Prosciutto di Parma right off the bone into snackable bites.

This event is FREE!


See you soon!

Food, Food Artisans

The City Goat from Zingerman’s Creamery

July Cheese of the Month

We make these soft, creamy, fresh goat cheese rounds with the best milk we can source from small Michigan goat farmers. Over the years we’ve been fortunate enough to build relationships with some pretty incredible goat dairies, people who are passionate about the health and long-term sustainability of their herds, and this kind of dedication to the animals really comes through in the quality of the milk we receive from them. In order to preserve as much of the depth of flavor in that awesome milk, we use low-temperature pasteurization, a method much gentler than the more prevalent short high-temp pasteurization that a lot of modern cheesemakers utilize.

city-goat

After that gentle pasteurization is complete we allow the goat’s milk to “set” overnight, which draws out even deeper and more complex flavors, maximizing its intensity. Once the resulting curds have reached a perfect consistency we do something a little different here at the Creamery—hand ladling. Each City Goat is hand ladled into separate perforated forms, which allow whey to drain at a consistent rate, and this painstaking and time-consuming process gives this cheese an amazing, evolving texture, from light and airy when very fresh to firm and perfect for crumbling when more aged.

More recently, we found a great way to package these cheeses. Back in the day we’d wrap them in translucent deli paper and set them out to continue draining, since wrapping them in plastic would lead to a less desirable texture over time. In our quest to find the best way to present our cheeses, we started packaging these tasty goat rounds in a small plastic container with a sealed top, The cheese features a very bright, clean, and slightly citrusy taste that pops in a variety of presentations.

For an easy appetizer, roll in freshly chopped rosemary, tarragon, basil, or any fresh herb you fancy. The citrus notes of this cheese are a perfect accompaniment to a number of charcuterie or crudités. Slice a city goat in half lengthwise, then stuff with roasted red peppers and pesto. For a Mediterranean experience, try it with honey and toasted almonds. When the City Goat is a little older and firmer, it is wonderful crumbled over salads or in any rich, tomato-based sauce.

The City Goat is available at Zingerman’s Creamery and Zingerman’s Delicatessen

See you soon! 

News, Food Artisans

Ari’s Favorite Brew

New crop Ethiopian coffee is in!

I’ve always loved Ethiopian coffee. Ever since I started paying attention to, and appreciating, the flavors of regional beans, the nuances of various roast levels, the variations of crop years and the other elements that make up a really exceptional cup, Ethiopian coffees have kept their spot at the top of my personal taste list. Their remarkable, always interesting, winy, at times blueberry-like, big flavors aren’t, I know, for everyone, but they’re definitely for me. I love ‘em.

Without question, I drink Ethiopian coffees more than any other single offering!

Happily, having just been to Ethiopia (see page 6 of Zingerman’s July/August newsletter) I can see why they’re so special to me. Not only do they taste great. They have a fantastic history to go with them.

Although not that many folks out in the world know it, Ethiopia is the literal homeland of coffee. It’s whereEthiopian-Coffee-Berries the coffee plant probably originated, and pretty surely where coffee was first consumed as a beverage. As the story goes, a young goat herder named Kaldi noticed his goats frolicking more than usual after eating the berries of a certain bush. He picked the berries and brought them to an Islamic monk who showed his disapproval by tossing them into the fire, from whence the first coffee roasting commenced. Somehow Kaldi decided to grind and brew the toasted beans and, apocryphally at least, coffee was born. Ethiopia is also the place from which Yemeni traders took coffee to Europe and the rest of the world. All of which is why coffee means about 88 times more in Ethiopia than it does anywhere else in the world.

What’s it like everywhere else? In most every other country in which it’s grown, coffee was introduced in relatively recent history, primarily by European colonists, and primarily for one purpose—not to make good mocha available, but to make money. Coffee was grown, not for personal consumption, but almost exclusively, for export. Unlike a garden where you grow your own tomatoes to enhance the excellence of your dining table, coffee was grown for cash. If someone wasn’t making a living growing coffee, he or she could be just as likely to grow tobacco, timber or tea. As a result, coffee is generally well-integrated, and often downright essential, to the economy of places like Costa Rica, Honduras and Kenya, but it’s generally NOT part of the culinary culture. Coffee is important to create jobs, earn income, and pay bills. But brewing and drinking great coffee is just not that big a deal. While clearly coffee has grown to become an important part of the culture (probably in Brazil more than anywhere else) the reality is that instant coffee is still a huge product in most producing countries.

Ethiopia is the exact opposite. Everyone (well, nearly everyone) drinks coffee. Nearly all of it is really good, if not, at times, excellent. More importantly, the majority of the population (there are exceptions) love—and almost revere—the stuff. About half of the annual crop is consumed internally. They appreciate coffee for the income it brings, but they care about coffee emotionally as much as they do their history, the culture, traditional dance, and language. Coffee in Ethiopia is like . . . cheese and wine in France, fish in Boston, rice in Japan, chiles in New Mexico, really wild, wild, rice for the Ojibwe people here in the upper Great Lakes.

How does that play out? Well, for openers pretty much every place serves pretty darned good coffee. To be clear, I don’t say that lightly. Honestly, I would really never drink coffee in a hotel, and only rarely in restaurants unless I know who roasted it and I like and trust the people who run the place. Commercially brewed coffee in those sorts of places is so rarely enjoyable (the general guideline for me is that bad tea is nearly always much, much better than bad coffee) so I just order black tea. But in Ethiopia at nearly every single place I ordered it the coffee was good. That alone is an amazing thing, a feat that would be unthinkable almost anywhere else in the world (including Europe and the U.S.) And some shops serve some seriously great coffee.

Some shops even brew beans from specific regions—called out by name—in Ethiopia. While that might seem mundane to folks in Southeast Michigan who are used to having access to regional and estate offerings of various coffee beans from Zingerman’s Coffee Company or in other quality focused cafés, it’s actually rarely seen in producing countries (other than maybe in a cafés run by growers or government sponsored coffee boards).

Most all of what I had on my visit to Ethiopia was brewed in filter pots and a fair few places used French press pots. A good many others pull shots of espresso (although often much longer shots than we’re used to here). Ethiopia, of course, is the only country on the continent never to have been colonized by a European country. As a result, energy and independence of spirit seem particularly high. Ethiopia was invaded by Italy back in the 1930s. The only big legacies of the invasion seem to be a high affinity for pizza, and the frequent use of Italian coffee brewing methods. Café Macchiato—the traditional Italian style, with only a small bit of milk and a shot of espresso—seems to be the most commonly consumed brew.

Ethiopians do have a very important traditional coffee ceremony which plays the same sort of role there that the tea ceremony does in Japan. Green coffee beans are roasted over hot coals in a metal pan. The coffee is then ground, often with a mortar and pestle. The new grounds are put into a special ceramic carafe. Water is added and brought to a boil so that it starts to rise through the long neck of the carafe. It’s then poured into another vessel to cool it a bit, then boiled again. To serve, the coffee is poured through a filter into handle-less cups. Generally the pot is moved back and forth over the series of cups so that the liquid is evenly distributed. Many Ethiopians add sugar. Some in the countryside add the traditional clarified butter and salt (this version of coffee becomes a bit of a traditional instant breakfast). The grounds are typically brewed three times. Teddy Araya told me that, the first round is called Abol, the second is Tonena and the third is Berk, the blessing. In some places like Tigrai, they serve to the fourth round. The best part is the first since it is the thickest. The subsequent ones will get lighter on every round. In Tigrai, they give the fourth round to kids.

The traditional accompaniment for coffee in Ethiopia? Not a croissant, not a cookie, not vanilla syrup. It’s popcorn. That’s right. If you order coffee in a traditional setting, say after dinner, it will come with a bowl of popcorn. And while that may seem odd, I’ll tell you that it’s actually darned delicious. Try it!

For me, here’s the ultimate testament to the import and care that accompany coffee culture in Ethiopia. When you goto the markets, alongside stalls selling vegetables, fruit, spices, etc. there are many that are selling green coffee beans. A few sell already roasted beans but the majority are still in their green, unroasted state. “Everyone here roasts their own at home,” a friend told us. Since our visit was short and I couldn’t speak Amharic to the men and woman working the stalls, I bought a half-kilo from one woman who seemed nice. She had three baskets (others had even more) of different green beans on display. I had no idea really what I was buying but just for fun, I bought some to bring back to the Coffee Company’s managing partner Steve Mangigian.

When I got back Steve roasted it up. After what I’ve written here, you shouldn’t be surprised to learn it was really good. No, not the single best coffee I’ve ever had in my life—but for a blind random choice it’s actually amazing that it was so tasty. If you’d told me it was a sample from one of our high-end brokers I’d have told you I really liked it, certainly very respectable. Culture, I’ve always believed, is a much better enforcer of ethical standards than any formal certification. The fact that it happened the way it did, by random meandering around the market in Addis Ababa, says a lot. Coffee in Ethiopia is serious business, so much so that market stalls wouldn’t even think of selling something bad. Coffee drinkers won’t tolerate it.

Our current Ethiopian bean from Zingerman’s Coffee Company is, as I said in the beginning, at the top of my consumption list. It’s a new crop—a 2015 harvest of coffee beans from the Harar district in Ethiopia’s northeast. It’s grown at very high altitudes—nearly 6000 feet—which contributes to the quality and complexity of the beans. The city of Harar, which sits at the center of the region, was founded between the 7th and 11th centuries and over time became a significant center of Islamic learning and culture. The Harari language is one of over 80 in Ethiopia! Aside from the excellence of its coffee, the area is also known for its basket weaving, bookbinding and poetry. Speaking of the latter, in the late 18th century it was home to the French poet Rimbaud. More importantly to matters at hand it’s said to be the first region in which indigenous wild coffee was domesticated.

The best Harar coffees, like this one, have wonderful winy, fruity flavors that remind me of blueberries, or at times maybe blackberries. It is a “natural” or “dry” processed coffee. The pulp of the coffee “cherry” is left on the “beans” in the center and dried naturally in the sun, which yields a more intense, fruity, full flavored coffee, which is, of course, the kind that I particularly love.

ari's-signature

Available at Zingerman’s Coffee Company and Zingerman’s Deli! 

Food, Food Artisans

This Week at Zingerman’s 7/14/15

Summer Sale

Summer Sale and Olive Oil Pop Up Shop at Mail Order and the Deli

Great things are happening at Mail Order right now! The first is our annual Summer Sale (also happening at Zingerman’s Deli!), which features amazing deals on some of our favorites! Like Bonito Tinned Tuna, or our famous Zzang Bars, or Rustichella Italian Pastas. Check out the Summer Sale page for more! Hurry, the sale ends July 31st! 
The other noteworthy event is our Olive Oil Pop Up Shop, which contains some really excellent oils at very affordable prices. Domestic favorites like California’s Seka Hills, or La Sovana from Tuscany, or Crudo, a bold, spicy oil from the southeastern corner of Italy. Check out the rest of the selection at our Pop Up Shop!


Brewing methods class at Zingerman’s Coffee Company

Learn the keys to successful coffee brewing using a wide variety of brewing methods from filter drip to syphon pot. We will take a single coffee and brew it 6 to 8 different ways, each producing a unique taste. We’ll learn the proper proportions and technique for each and discuss the merits and differences of each style.

Reserve your seat here


White Wine & Cheese Tasting at Zingerman’s Creamery

Join us as we explore the beautiful variety of white wines produced in our great state of Michigan! From light, dry, crisp Pinots to sweet, full-bodied Gewurztraminer we will taste through some of our top white wine picks and pair them up with cheeses from the shop.

Reserve your seat here


Welcome to Cornman Farms tour

Our Welcome to Cornman Farms Tour is an idyllic and dynamic 90 minute introduction to the rich history, agricultural projects and humane raising of animals. Join us Wednesday, July 29, 6pm, for a look at our vegetable and herb gardens, goat milking operation and historic restored Farmhouse and Barn—and enjoy a meet-and-greet with our visionary Managing Partner, Kieron Hales.

Reserve your seat here


1st Sunday Tour at Zingerman’s Creamery

Join our cheese and gelato makers on Sunday, August 2, 2pm, for an hour-long adventure as we transform local milk into delicious cheese and gelato. You’ll watch our fresh mozzarella stretched into shape, taste our cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses while our staff explain the cheesemaking process, and sample our delicious fresh gelato. After the tour, make time for tasting our selection of American cheeses and provisions, as well as house made gelatos and sorbets in our cheese shop.
*Please note, our production facility is very warm and humid during the summer months!

Reserve your seat here


Tea Time With a Twist at Zingerman’s Creamery

You might not think of tea as being a typical pairing for a slice of cheese, but the two can be exceptionally good together. Much like wine, certain teas contain tannins that are released once the tea leaves are exposed to hot water, giving it a full-bodied taste and making it a perfect accompaniment to cheese. Our cheesemongers have teamed up with the experts next door at the Zingerman’s Coffee Co. to choose some of our favorite teas sourced from Rishi Tea and picked some perfect cheeses to pair up that will make you look at tea time in a whole new way! Friday, August 7, 6pm. 

Reserve your seat here


11th Annual Piazza Zingermanza at Zingerman’s Deli

Saturday August 15 and Sunday, August 16, 11am – 3pm
Our annual August tradition of transforming the Deli’s Patio into an Italian Street Food Festival is one of the highlights of the year. There will be good food, good music, good demos, good deals and good company. New this year, a kids’ pasta tasting. It’s an event not to be missed!

Demonstrations:
12 noon: Witness our cheesemongers break down 80 pound wheels of Parmigiano Reggiano in one pound chunks.

1 pm: Behold as we transform curd into delectable fresh mozzarella balls sold by the half pound.

2 pm: Observe our skilled staff slicing true Prosciutto di Parma right off the bone into snackable bites.

This event is FREE!


See you soon!